Tiffanie Turner in studio

IN THE STUDIO: TIFFANIE TURNER

For the current group show at Winston Wächter Fine Art in Seattle I created a new three-headed piece which shows the Edward Scissorhands of it all, two chrysanthemums overshadowing a third in a bouquet, depicting what might happen when something or someone is neglected or outshined by others. When I was working on that piece I was really meditating on my own narcissism vis-à-vis my children, but I think these pieces are there for people to react to with their own narratives. It was technically the most difficult piece I’ve ever made. I decided to start to “reject circles” this year. The circular form of a single flower is something I’ve been slowly moving away from over time, but preparing for this show I really committed to being able to view these pieces on the wall at more natural angles than just dead-on and circular-faced. I’m very happy about it now, but it was a real beast to create. I think there are a few thousand hand sculpted petals on it.

Three Chrysanthemums, 2020, Paper mâché, Italian crepe paper, glue, stain, wire, wood rods, 46.5 x 45.5 x 24 inches

Three Chrysanthemums, 2020, Paper mâché, Italian crepe paper, glue, stain, wire, wood rods, 46.5 x 45.5 x 24 inches

Three Chrysanthemums in studio

Three Chrysanthemums in studio

I always say, I am not a botanist. I do a fair amount of research on the flowers I recreate, and it is always ideal to get my hands on real specimens, but I can’t always do that. I came to this as a practicing California architect who loved flowers, but loved flowers as ornament even more. Seed packets, art deco railings, Charles Rennie Mackintosh watercolors, these types of things are what I have always gravitated to. Now I love real flowers so much, I will react as if I’ve seen a movie star if I see a flower in person that I’ve only seen previously in a photo. It will make my heart race when that happens. I love everything about flowers. I don’t think every flower is suited for paper in a way that clicks for me, but the challenge of studying and replicating them, in my small (life-sized) work especially, has been constantly compelling for me.
The thing about flowers is that we all know what they are, we’ve all drawn one, we’ve all touched one. They are accessible and beautiful, and I have found it so fascinating to watch people be drawn to them so easily, with their guard down. Flowers are wonderful vehicles for expression and sharing conceptual ideas in that way.
Tiffanie Turner in studio

Tiffanie Turner in studio

Turner studio, work in progress

Turner studio, work in progress

studio tools

studio tools

Growing older and losing your younger appearance is a loss. There is a painful time where you realize this is happening, and then you find yourself on the other side of it, and older people look more beautiful to you, and you can relate to them more, and you can try to find the good in being older. I want to continue to advocate for finding the beauty of aging with my work. If we can find such magnetism in a rotting ranunculus or rose, can we still feel that for a person with age spots and jowls? I think we need to!

Specimen C Ranunculus, 2019, Paper, 35 x 35 x 19 inches

Specimen C Ranunculus, 2019, Paper, 35 x 35 x 19 inches